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How to Can Redbud Jelly | A Flower Jelly

This delightful flower jelly is one for every pantry. Preserve Redbud flower season and learn how to can Redbud jelly. The light pink color and slight floral taste makes this Redbud jelly recipe a new favorite here on the farm.

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Flower jellies are a favorite of mine. There’s something to be said about a jelly spread which has a hint of floral flavor from the blossom being used. Not to mention, the color of the jelly represents the color of the flower. Is there anything quite as perfect as this? I don’t think so.

Over the years I have made a few flower jellies, though the ones my family loved best were:

With that said, there are a few flower jellies on my list to make, elderberry and wild violet. The farm has an abundance of elderberry bushes, which means I’ll be making elderberry jelly in the near future!

I get asked often how to consume flower jellies, and the answer is rather simple. Add the jelly over a block of melted Brie, on top of vanilla bean ice-cream, cream cheese, or homemade cultured butter.

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The Ingredients

When making any flower jelly, the main ingredient is flower tea. In this case, you will need to make redbud blossom tea. The essence of the the blossoms is drawn out during the tea making process.

For Redbud Tea

  • 10 cups of redbud blossoms
  • 5 cups of boiling water

For Redbud Jelly

  • 3 tablespoons fresh or bottled lemon juice
  • 4 1/2 cups of sugar, or equal amount of honey
  • 1 box of pectin, powdered or liquid (liquid seems to work in getting jellies to set)
Learn how to can redbud flower jelly with the easy steps in this article.

EQUIPMENT

This recipe calls for 6-half pint mason jars, however, you may have some redbud flower jelly remaining. It is best to have 7-half pint jars ready. If the 7th jar is not filled, simply store in the refrigerator and use first.

  • 6-half pint mason jars with lids and rings
  • steam or hot water bath canner
  • mini-crockpot to warm lids
  • half-gallon mason jar to make the flower tea
  • jar funnel
  • ladle
  • 8-quart pot

How to Can Redbud Jelly

Keep in mind, there are two steps for making Redbud jelly. The first step is to make the flower tea which must sit overnight to achieve the essence of the blossoms. Once the tea is ready, you can then begin making this seasonal flower jelly.

Day 1Prepare the Tea

  1. Wash the Redbud blossoms, making sure to remove any leaves and stems.
  2. Boil 5 cups of water
  3. Add the blossoms and boiling water to the 1/2-gallon mason jar
  4. Allow the tea to completely cool to room temperature prior to placing it in the refrigerator overnight
  5. The next day, strain the liquid from the blossoms. Gently pressing the blossoms will release additional liquid.
This redbud jelly recipe is a great spring time item to can for long-term storage.

Day 2 – Canning Steps

Prepare the Jars, lids, and canner

  1. Warm the lids by placing them into the mini slow cooker.
  2. Warm jars
  3. Add water to the canner, and heat the water.

Redbud flower jelly

  1. In a measuring cup, collect 4 cups of Redbud blossom tea.
  2. Add the tea to the 8-quart pot and bring to boil.
  3. Next add the lemon juice and sugar (or honey) and bring to a hard boil.
  4. Allow the mixture to hard boil for 2 minutes, making sure to stir often.
  5. Ladle the jelly into the warm jars, leaving a 1/4-inch headspace.
  6. Using a clean dishcloth, wipe the rims of the jars.
  7. Add warm lids and tighten rings to finger tight.
  8. Place into the canner.
  9. Process for 10 minutes, adjust the processing time based on your altitude (add an 1 minute for every 1,000 feet above sea level)
  10. Remove jars from the canner and allow them to rest for 12 hours. Please note, jelly can take up to 24 hours to set.

Enjoy this Redbud jelly recipe! Here is a printable recipe card for you to tuck away until blossoms appear.

Yield: 6 1/2-pints

How to Can Redbud Jelly

How to Can Redbud Jelly
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Additional Time 12 hours
Total Time 12 hours 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • 10 cups of redbud blossoms
  • 5 cups of boiling water
  • 3 tablespoons fresh or bottled lemon juice
  • 4 1/2 cups of sugar, or equal amount of honey
  • 1 box of pectin, powdered or liquid (liquid pectin seems to work best in helping jellies set)

Instructions

Redbud Blossom Tea


Wash the Redbud blossoms, making sure to remove any leaves and stems.

Boil 5 cups of water

Add the blossoms and boiling water to the 1/2-gallon mason jar

Allow the tea to completely cool to room temperature prior to placing it in the refrigerator overnight

The next day, strain the liquid from the blossoms. Gently pressing the blossoms will release additional liquid.

Canning Redbud Flower Jelly


Warm the lids by placing them into the mini slow cooker.

Warm jars

Add water to the canner, and heat the water.

In a measuring cup, collect 4 cups of Redbud blossom tea.

Add the tea to the 8-quart pot and bring to boil.

Next add the lemon juice and sugar (or honey) and bring to a hard boil.

Allow the mixture to hard boil for 2 minutes, making sure to stir often.

Ladle the jelly into the warm jars, leaving a 1/4-inch headspace.

Using a clean dishcloth, wipe the rims of the jars.

Add warm lids and tighten rings to finger tight.

Place into the canner.

Process for 10 minutes, adjust the processing time based on your altitude (add an 1 minute for every 1,000 feet above sea level)

Remove jars from the canner and allow them to rest for 12 hours. Please note, jelly can take up to 24 hours to set.

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Nutrition Information:

Yield:

14

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 266Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 11mgCarbohydrates: 69gFiber: 0gSugar: 66gProtein: 0g

Nutrition information isn’t always accurate.

Did you make this recipe?

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Of all the flower jellies which I’ve made, I believe this rosebud jelly to be my favorite. Hopefully you will enjoy it as much as I do!

The Pinterest pin image for my redbud flower jelly recipe.

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