How To Steam Quail Eggs

steaming quail eggs

The quail have finally started laying and we are thrilled to be able to begin consuming those bite size eggs!  We have learned over time that hard-boiling farm fresh eggs will get you no where, so we didn’t even attempt it with the quail eggs.  Steaming quail eggs would be our only option if we wanted the perfect hard egg, but how to steam quail eggs was the question. What I mean exactly is, how long should you steam those tiny eggs?

Farm fresh eggs do not hard-boil nicely.  Period.  Have you ever tried hard-boiling truly fresh eggs? By truly fresh I mean eggs that were laid that same day or a few days past.  Goodness, the damage done to the egg white is horrible!

steaming quail eggs
Farm fresh eggs do not hard-boil well

Market eggs tend to peel perfectly.  Why?  Because they’re OLD!   The FDA requires eggs sold in American to be washed, which removed the bloom ~ the natural protective barrier placed on the egg as it’s being laid.  Once the bloom has been washed away the egg become porous, allowing air to enter through the eggshell.  Air that has entered the egg causes the albumen (egg white) to shrink slightly, also making the albumen to become more acidic.  Over a short period of time the space between the membrane and the egg shell will grow, causing eggs, which are hard-boiled, to then peel easily.

Want to keep your farm fresh eggs to stay fresher longer?  Don’t wash them, keep the bloom intact and store them in the refrigerator; only keep out the amount  eggs you plan on using for the next few days on the counter.

how to steam quail eggs
We raise Coturnix Quail and love them

Steaming quail eggs (or any type of farm fresh egg) is quite easy.  The process is simple and all you’ll need is a vegetable steamer, a pot and a tight fitting lid.  

Add about 1 inch of water to the pot, if the water flows over the bottom of the vegetable steamer you have to much water in the pot.

Once the water has come to a hard boil, add the quail eggs.  Set your timer for 10 minutes, if you’d like a soft boiled egg you’ll steam the egg for just 8 minutes.  Keep in mind, anything longer than 10 minutes will cause the egg whites to become rubbery in texture.

steaming quail eggs
Coturnix Quail eggs

A bamboo steamer also works very well. 

steaming quail eggs
Steam farm fresh chicken eggs for 21 minutes

Once the steaming process is complete, immediately remove the eggs and place them into cold water for a few minutes.  I like to add an ice cube to the bowl to make sure my water is cold, but it’s not necessary.

How To Steam Quail Eggs

The egg shells will peel easily and what you have is the perfect egg for salads, pickling or an excellent protein snack.

How To Steam Quail Eggs

If you’re still hard-boiling your farm fresh eggs, for the sake the farm fresh, please STOP!  No-ones wants to serve up an ugly egg and now you don’t have to.

 

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How To Steam Quail Eggs

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Comments

  1. Cook’s Country came out with Steamed Hard Cooked Eggs a month ago. They have you steaming regular store bought eggs for 13 minutes and then an ice water bath. Are farm fresh that different than store bought with your 21 minute steam? Just curious…..

    • Oh, yes! Farm fresh eggs are very much different than store bought eggs and they do need to be steamed for at least 21 minutes.

  2. Yes, farm fresh eggs can be boiled and shell slips off quite nicely if done this way. First, bring your water to a boil (enough to cover12 eggs). Using large spoon or tongs place eggs in water, cover, and boil for 15 minutes. Place in ice water for 15 minutes, then peel or refrigerate for future use. Works every time!

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