Daikon Radish Kimchi |Healing Foods

Daikon radish kimchi is one of the most delicious healing food items one can consume. This traditional kimchi recipe can be made year round and is extremely easy to make.

Healing foods. These foods are readily available, yet, many do not realize how such foods help the body. How we became disconnect from our food source is beyond me. However, now is the time to become reacquainted with it. And there’s no better place to start than by making this traditional kimchi recipe ideal.

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The Herbalist’s Healing Kitchen | Use the Power of Food to Cook Your Way to Better Health by Devon Young

Growing up in Korea, while being raised by my Thai mother, taught me to love and value food. Clean eating was the only option on the table, and homecooking meant exactly that. Homecooking.

Meals consisted of real food with real ingredients, like this fermented horseradish root. I knew no other way of eating.

Throughout my youth fermented food was always available. There was always something fermented on our plate, and not one person complained about it. It was a basic food item, and it is still served daily in my parents home to this date.

Americans are being reintroduced to the world of fermentation. The connection that whole, clean foods have the ability to reduce inflammation, lower blood pressure, and stimulate the brain while boosting the immune system. In truth, this information is mind blowing to many.

When you learn the medicinal potential in your own kitchen, you can create meals that are deeply healing. – Devon Young

The Herbalist’s Healing Kitchen | Use the Power of Food to Cook Your Way to Better Health

And that is what lead me to share with Devon my daikon radish kimchi recipe. She showcased and shared exactly why a fermented food item like this is a necessity. Devon also explains that the daikon radish root is capable of helping with headaches, is full of vitamin C, and helps to open congested, restricted airways.

In a nutshell this kimchi recipe is a perfect one to foster immunity and good health. Amen to that!

The Herbalist’s Healing Kitchen is available on Amazon. The recipes found within the book are easy to make, the photos are stunning, and the information is one you will not find elsewhere. Go ahead, take a peak at the book and its recipes, what do you have to loose?

Until you do, enjoy this recipe from the book!

Daikon Radish Kimchi – Ingredients

The ingredients found in this recipe are basic items for those who do a lot of Asian cooking. No worries, many of the ingredients are available online.

  • 4 pounds Daikon Radish
  • 2 tbsp Sea Salt
  • 2 tbsp Sugar
  • 1/4 cup Fish or Soy Sauce
  • 2/3 cup Red Pepper Powder, Gochugaru
  • 5 Scallions, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • Distilled Water, as needed

Daikon Radish Kimchi – Equipment

Daikon Radish Kimchi – Instructions

This quick ferment is full of amazing flavor, and within a short 48 hours you will be devouring it!

  1. Peel and dice the daikon into 1/4-inch cubes or 1 to 1 1/2-inch julienne. Rinse well and pat it dry. Place the daikon in a large bowl and toss it with salt and sugar until it’s well distributed. Cover the bowl with a clean dish cloth and set aside.
  2. After 1 hour, drain the daikon, reserving one-quarter of the exuded liquid.
  3. Toss the daikon with the fish sauce, reserved the liquid, reserved liquid, red pepper powder, scallions, if using, and garlic.
  4. Pack this tightly into a 1/2-gallong (1.9-L) jar, leaving at least 2 inches of headspace to allow for expansion. Liquid should exude to cover the contents within a couple of hours. If the contents of the kimchi are no covered within 2 hours, add just enough distilled water to cover.
  5. Using an airlock lid or a loosely secured plastic lid, ferment the kimchi at room temperature for 48 to 72 hours, tasting regularly after 48 hours for personal preference. The kimchi will become increasingly sour after 72 hours, so it is a matter of flavor preference.
  6. After fermentation, refrigerate the kimchi to slow/stop the fermentation. Refrigerate for 2 to 3 weeks.

Note

Gochurgaru, the red pepper powder for making daikon radish kimchi, is available at most Asian markets and through online retailers. The amount of gochurgaru called for in this recipe will result in a moderately intense spice; adjust according to your personal taste.

Printable Recipe Card – Daikon Radish Kimchi | A Traditional Kimchi Recipe

For your convenience a printable recipe card is available. Enjoy, and good eating!

Print Recipe
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Daikon Radish Kimchi | A Traditional Kimchi Recipe

Daikon is traditionally diced for serving as a side dish, or julienned when served as a condiment. This quick fermentation can be ready to eat in as little as 48 hours. I love this kimchi on top of rice or mixed with scrambled eggs.
Course: Fermentation
Cuisine: Korean
Keyword: Daikon Radish Kimchi

Equipment

  • 1/2 Gallon Mason Jar
  • Jar Funnel
  • Glass Mixing Bowl
  • Clean Dish Cloth
  • Airlock Fermenting Lid

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Peel and dice the daikon into 1/4-inch cubes or 1 to 1 1/2-inch julienne. Rinse well and pat it dry. Place the daikon in a large bowl and toss it with salt and sugar until it’s well distributed. Cover the bowl with a clean dish cloth and set aside.
  • After 1 hour, drain the daikon, reserving one-quarter of the exuded liquid.
  • Toss the daikon with the fish sauce, reserved the liquid, reserved liquid, red pepper powder, scallions, if using, and garlic.
  • Pack this tightly into a 1/2-gallong (1.9-L) jar, leaving at least 2 inches of headspace to allow for expansion. Liquid should exude to cover the contents within a couple of hours. If the contents of the kimchi are no covered within 2 hours, add just enough distilled water to cover.
  • Using an airlock lid or a loosely secured plastic lid, ferment the kimchi at room temperature for 48 to 72 hours, tasting regularly after 48 hours for personal preference. The kimchi will become increasingly sour after 72 hours, so it is a matter of flavor preference.
  • After fermentation, refrigerate the kimchi to slow/stop the fermentation. Refrigerate for 2 to 3 weeks.

Notes

Gochugaru is available at most Asian markets and through online retailers. The amount of gochugaru called for in this recipe will result in a moderately intense spice; adjust according to your personal taste.
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