Turmeric Paste For Your Fur Babies

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We have two dogs here at our homestead, Old Farm Dog is 15 years old and Miss Harley Quinn is 8 months old, and both are loved dearly! 

When we brought Miss Harley home at 8 weeks, we knew because of her breed, Old English Mastiff -Pitbull mix, she would benefit being fed a full raw diet (that’s for a different blog) and we wanted to raise her as naturally as we could.  With all my research on raw feeding I stumbled upon quite a few articles in regards to the benefits of providing our furry friends turmeric paste. 

I knew of the benefits it provides in human consumption, but hadn’t realized how much it actually contributes to good health for canines.  Turmeric is a root which contains curcumin, and it is used throughout Asia in cooking and for its healing properties (curcumin is a natural pain reliever and an anti-inflammatory).

Let me give you a quick summary of some of the benefits in feeding it to your dogs: turmeric is great for their heart, helps to detoxify the liver, contains anti-cancer properties~it is said it can help prevent and can even be used to treat cancer, an anti-oxident, reduces inflammation, kills parasites, great for treating diarrhea, high in vitamins & minerals, helps to relieve allergies, and the list goes on! 

Making turmeric paste is extremely easy, and as you can see, the benefits are to great to not consider providing it for your pet.  Both Old Farm Dog and Miss Harley receive turmeric paste daily, and I won’t lie….they do not like the taste of it, but I have gotten quite crafty in how to get them to eat it!

We make enough to last us 2 weeks, and to make it easier on us we make them in these silicone mini ice cube trays (affiliated) which measure out to 1/4 of a teaspoon per cube.  I grab as many cubes I need per dog, and I don’t have to worry about scooping anything out; it’s about convenience for me!

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We also have the 1/4 teaspoon heart shape molds (affiliated) as well! 

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The process is extremely simple, and with 4 ingredients how can you mess up?  Well, you really can’t!

Start with 1/2 cup organic turmeric (organic contains much more curcumin) and 1 cup of water.  You may need more water if your paste is to thick.

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Stir on low heat for 10 minutes.  If the mixture is to watery, add a bit more turmeric.  If the mixture is to thick, add a bit more water.

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Add 1 1/2 teaspoons of freshly ground black pepper.   Use organic whole black peppercorn, and grind finely; we use our nutri-bullet to do the job.

It is important to add the freshly ground black pepper.  Not only does the black pepper have beneficial qualities for overall health (helps with gum care, it can help to eliminate internal parasites, and actually helps to absorb many vitamins & minerals), it helps in allowing the curcumin to absorb into their system, and creating the paste without it would not be as beneficial.

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Lastly, add 1/4 cup of organic cold press virgin coconut oil. 

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Continue to stir on medium low heat until the coconut oil is completely dissolved, and all ingredients are completely mixed together.

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You will notice that the paste will take on the consistency of pumpkin pie filling, because of the coconut oil it will be much softer than when you first started, but it should not be runny.

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At this point you can begin filling your trays ~ I am going to warn you, the turmeric will turn your hands and whatever it touches yellow…ask me how I know this! 

Make sure to pack the trays tightly to prevent any possible air bubbles.  Scrape off any excess adding it to the next tray.

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Once both trays are filled place them into the freezer to completely cool.

10420762_10207536965883668_4189610228584542979_n Once the turmeric paste is solid remove from the trays and store refrigerated in a glass container for up to 2 weeks.

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A 1/4 of a teaspoon (one cube) for every 10 pounds can be fed to your fur baby daily.  Earlier I stated that our dogs do not enjoy the flavor of turmeric, so I have become very creative in getting them to consume it.  I have hidden cubes in their Greek yogurt, kefir, or coconut oil.

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The cubes can also be crushed and mixed with a raw egg, coconut oil, or any probiotic you are serving.

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However you can get your pup to eat it will be a win-win for you both!  Serving turmeric paste can lead to constipation, so make sure there is always water on hand to prevent this issue.  If your pup should become constipated a few tablespoons of organic pumpkin puree will help to get their bowels moving.

 

 

 

 

 

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Comments

    • Hi there, freshly ground black pepper helps to absorb the turmeric powder ~ curcumin absorbs poorly and needs assistance. But black pepper also has beneficial qualities to your dog as well ~ it eliminates internal parasites, helps promote good gums, and helps to many overall nutrients

  1. Can I ask, why the ground pepper?
    Is there another, separate benefit from fresh ground pepper or does it have a synergistic property with the turmeric?
    Thanks, JoAnn

    • Hi there, freshly ground black pepper helps to absorb the turmeric powder ~ curcumin absorbs poorly and needs assistance. But black pepper also has beneficial qualities to your dog as well ~ it eliminates internal parasites, helps promote good gums, and helps to many overall nutrients

    • Yes, and this recipe is also good for human consumption. I don’t know if you have every consumed turmeric paste, it does have quite a ‘different’ flavor. Many just use it in their cooking, but it is important to add the black pepper, it helps in allow the curcumin to be absorbed in your body. Here is a good blog & website on some good ways to consume it if you can’t pop it! http://www.turmericforhealth.com/?s=10+easy+ways+to+consume+turmeric

  2. Your recipe calls for dried Turmeric. But I have fresh roots. Can you tell me what amount of fresh grated turmeric I could use? My dog has had 3 different procedures on her left knee. Heart of a runner, knees of a couch potato. I had put her on drugs, so I would really like to try this. She is very, very, very picky. I will have to do this like I do prescriptions. Force feed her. But I would really like to give it a try.

    • It’s not a science, but a rule of thumb. 1 inch of fresh turmeric grated equals 1 teaspoon of ground turmeric powder. I hope this helps!

  3. Have tried making this with anything other than the coconut oil! Hubby is allergic to coconut and I try everything to not use it at all due to this reason! WAY to risky! Maybe peanut butter or even crisco? Thanks for any substitutions really want to try this as we have 5 pups and 2 could really use this boost to their little systems!

    • The coconut oil is the binding element, but if that is an issue I would just mix the turmeric & black pepper together and sprinkle onto their food. You may consider making peanut balls with turmeric & black pepper and providing it that way, but I have never tried it! I would start with 1/8 teaspoon of the powder mixture.

  4. I totally agree! I give turmeric to my dog as well. However, I feel the need to say “be careful with the amount you give your dog”. Do some research or ask your vet for a safe amount. Too much Turmeric can thin blood (causing bruising), lower blood sugar and cause stomach problems. So, if a dog is diabetic, taking stomach medication (ex. antacids) or taking a medication that thins blood (ex. prednisone), it is best to give in small amounts or not at all. It is also not recommended to take if pregnant. The benefits outweigh the side effects but just be safe! 🙂

  5. My shitzu has severe skin allergies as well as constant yeast infections all over his body. I have spent a tremendous amount of money over the past year on vet bills and he still has skin issues . Does this help with skin allergies and yeast infections on his skin? My poor little guy is so miserable .

    • The skin issues and the excessive amount of yeast in your dog’s body is more than likely caused by his dog food. Our Shitzu mix had horrible issues with yeast, hot spots, allergies and we made 2 changes. The first one being taking him off of commercial foods. We were feeding him the ‘best’ industrial food there, but come to find out sweet potatoes are high in sugar which can cause yeast build up as well. So I began making his food. Though the issues lightened he still had issues. I finally switched him to a full raw diet (blog being released next week) and he NO LONGER HAS THOSE ISSUES! Hot spots are completely gone, no longer has yeast issues, no longer has allergies, no longer has tarter build up (he’s 15), and I believe we added years to his life. The turmeric paste will not help with your other issues, sadly only a complete diet change will do that.

  6. This recipe is the exact one from Dr. Doug English. He is a huge proponent turmeric paste in both animal and human. It would’ve been nice to see credit given to him.

    • This recipe can be found in just about every natural food, dog health, natural living site you can get your hands on. It is very difficult to pin point it to one particular individual to issue proper credit.

  7. Read this with great interest. I startes using turmeric curcumin for relief from arthritis. Seems to work better than the drugs and chemicals available from the pharmacy. I just might try this recipe for myself. I abhor anything coconut, so I might try a little olive oil and see what happens. Anything that relieves pain is of interest, especially when I have to hual equipment in cool damp weather. My hands hurt to the point I have trouble shifting gears in the Kenworth.

    • Hey Frank,

      The turmeric is amazing for joints and pains. My husband has worked construction for the past 25 years, and his body is pretty much uncomfortable all the time. In addition to giving him turmeric (turmeric milk as well – blog can be found here on our website) I give him and essential oil blend called Deep Blue. It has made such a difference for him, and he can now function daily without being uncomfortable. If you are interested in learning more about the Deep Blue feel free to email me at afarmgirlinthemaking@gmail.com. He swears by it.

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